10 Interesting Facts About Emma Smith

10 Interesting Facts About Emma Smith

by Aleah Ingram

Emma Smith is one of the most fascinating characters of the Restoration. She is remembered for her unrelenting strength and ability to overcome hardships. On the anniversary of her birth, which took place on July 10, 1804, in Harmony, Pennsylvania, here are ten interesting facts you may not have known about Emma Smith.

ONE. Emma wasn’t planning on eloping. In 1827, Emma was visiting a Mr. Stowell and his family in New York. She saw Joseph there, who she had been courting for seventeen months. She would write : “I had no intention of marrying when I left home; but, during my visit at Mr. Stowell’s [Joseph]…urged me to marry him, and preferring to marry him to any other man I knew, I consented.”

TWO. The angel Moroni told Joseph he would receive the gold plates and other hidden items in September if he brought with him the right person. After looking into the seer stone, Joseph discovered the right person was “Emma Hale.” Nine months after their marriage, Emma drove the wagon to the Hill Cumorah and waited while Joseph gathered the plates.

THREE. Emma toiled thousands of extra hours so that Joseph had the time to accomplish of the work of the Lord.

FOUR. Emma was considered an herb doctor and often went among the sick to administer medicine.

FIVE. Joseph and Emma were distant cousins. Both had ancestors on the Mayflower.

SIX. Emma opposed using the word “benevolent” in the name of the newly founded women’s society, as suggested by Joseph Smith and Elder John Taylor. Benevolent was a popular word for women’s societies of the day and Emma did not want the church’s women’s society to be associated with the world. After discussion, it was decided that the society would be called the Female Relief Society of Nauvoo.

SEVEN. The current hymnbook of the Church has twenty-six of the hymns that appeared in Emma’s 1835 hymnal, which she compiled after revelation from the Lord.

EIGHT. Emma had a beautiful soprano voice. Records state she often sang obbligato parts in choral groups and filled the Smith home with sweet music.

NINE. Brigham Young sent money to Emma through a Church attorney to pay off the debts of Joseph Smith and the Church in Nauvoo. The attorney, Almon Babbit, kept all the money for himself and neither Brigham nor Emma ever knew.

TENTH. Emma saw Jesus Christ and Joseph in a dream before her death.

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Elder M. Russell Ballard lays wreath in Nauvoo cemetery

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865659936/Elder-M-Russell-Ballard-lays-wreath-in-Nauvoo-cemetery.html?pg=all

NAUVOO, ILL.

Two apostles Elder M. Russell Ballard of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Elder Lachlan Mackay of the Community of Christ (both descendants of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith) met with more than 400 cousins in Nauvoo, Illinois, on Aug. 6 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Smith families coming together to beautify, enlarge, landscape and increase access to the Smith Family Cemetery.

Elder Mackay, a great-great-great-grandson of the Prophet Joseph Smith, and Elder Ballard, a great-great-grandson of the Prophets brother Hyrum, laid wreaths on the graves of Joseph Smith Sr., Lucy Mack Smith, Joseph Smith, Emma Hale Smith and Hyrum Smith. They were assisted by Anina Luff, Elder Mackays mother; and Katie Clayton, one of Elder Ballards granddaughters. Elder Ballard said that two of Josephs other brothers, Don Carlos Smith and Samuel Smith, are buried in the cemetery but the exact location of their graves isnt known.

During the ceremony, the family also placed a marker to honor Lewis C. Bidamon, Emmas second husband and the last to be buried in the cemetery. Elder Mackay spoke of Bidamons welcoming generosity, his humor and his caring of Emmas sons. For raising [Joseph Smith Jr.s] children I will be eternally grateful. I am just thrilled we are finally able to mark Lewis grave, Elder Mackay said.

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Samuel Smith: Missionary to Prophets

https://history.lds.org/article/samuel-smith-missionary-to-prophets?lang=eng

15 June 2016

Samuel H. Smith, though not as well known as his older brothers Joseph and Hyrum Smith, played an influential role in the early history of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1829 he moved to Harmony, Pennsylvania, to work Josephs farm while Joseph translated the Book of Mormon,1 and he even briefly served as Josephs scribe. He was the third person baptized after the Aaronic Priesthood was restored,2 and he was chosen as one of the Eight Witnesses to see and handle the plates from which the Book of Mormon was translated. When the Church was organized, Samuel was one of the six original members.3 It seems fitting, then, that Samuel was called as the first missionary of the newly organized Church.

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Emma’s Request

 

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Gift Honors Surgery that Saved Joseph Smith’s Leg

http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/spring16/html/giving_surgery/

ByNancy Fontaine

giving_surgery_01Descendants of Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon Church, have created a scholarship at the Geisel School of Medicine to honor and give thanks for a pioneering surgery that Dartmouth’s Dr. Nathan Smith performed on young Joseph.

Two hundred years ago, a surgeon in rural New Hampshire saved a young boy’s leg and possibly his life. This was no ordinary treatment, however. The surgeon was Dr. Nathan Smith, founder of Dartmouth’s medical school; the child was Joseph Smith, who later founded the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; and the surgery was far ahead of its time.

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Lucy Mack Smith’s Gold Bead

https://history.lds.org/article/lucy-mack-smiths-gold-bead?lang=eng

Church History Museum

Museum Treasures

Heidi Bennett -

This tiny gold bead is easy to overlook among all the larger artifacts in the museum, but it carries a story that gives us important insight into the faith and character of the Prophet Joseph Smiths parents.

In 1830, Joseph Smith Jr. published the Book of Mormon and formally organized the Church in Fayette, New York. Many people, however, were not pleased with these events.

Later that year, a man came to the home of the Prophets parents, Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith, to collect a debt of $14. That amount back then would be worth about $300 to $350 today. Father Smith told the man that he could pay him only $6 at that moment but that he would pay the rest when he could.

Lucy recalled that the man refused that proposal, but he offered to forgive the entire debt if Joseph Sr. would burn all the copies of the Book of Mormon in the Smith home. Joseph replied, No si[r] I shall not do that.1

Very well, the man replied, thee shall go to jail then.

At this point, fearing for her husband, Lucy stepped in and took the gold beads from her neck, saying, These beads are the full value of the remainder of the debt . . . I beg of you to take these and be satisfied.2

When he refused her offer, Lucy declared, You think by this to compel us to deny the work of God and to destroy a book which we know has be[en] brought forth by the gift of the Holy Ghost but sir we shall not burn the book of Mormon nor deny the inspiration of the Almighty.3

The creditor was unmoved, and he had the constable take Joseph Smith Sr. to a debtors prison, where he would remain for nearly a month. Joseph Sr. later told his son Samuel, Immediately after I left your mother, the men by whom I was taken commenced using every possible argument to induce me to renounce the Book of Mormon; saying how much better it would be for [me] to deny that silly thing, than to be disgraced, and imprisoned.4Joseph Sr. ignored their taunts and was consoled that he was not the first man, who had been imprisoned for the truths sake.5

During his imprisonment, he worked as a cooper until he was able to earn enough money to satisfy the debt. Joseph Sr. preached to his fellow inmates and converted two of them to the gospel.6

This ordeal is one of many that the Smiths endured as they wholeheartedly supported their son Joseph Smith Jr. in his role as Prophet. This single gold bead, though of little monetary value, represents the great value of the Smiths unshakable faith.

Footnotes

[1] Lucy Mack Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, History, 18441845, book 10, page 3, josephsmithpapers.org.

[2] Lucy Mack Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, History, 18441845, book 10, page 3.

[3] Lucy Mack Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, History, 18441845, book 10, page 3.

[4] Lucy Mack Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 185, josephsmithpapers.org.

[5] Lucy Mack Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 185.

[6] See Lucy Mack Smith, Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845, 186.

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